KT2017: “Built/Unbuilt” exhibit focussing on migration and identity

KT2017: “Built/Unbuilt” exhibit focussing on migration and identity

Artists from Doha and Kathmandu cooperated under the curation of Dina Bangdel on a project to research and artistically interpret the burning issues of what migration does to peoples identity: “Built/Unbuilt: Home/City”. More than 150 guests joined the opening at Tangalwood in Naxal, being treated to great art and even greater artist talks later in the evening, including a performance by Nepali artist Sunil Sigdel. The exhibition was inaugurated by the ambassador of Qatar and eminent Qatari artis Yousuf Ahmad was honored as “KT2017 Distinguished Artist”.

 

 

Close to 500,000 migrant workers live and work in Qatar, more or less slaving away to keep the fast-paced modernization and building boom of the small emirate going. A lot of media coverage has focused on the hardships the migrant workers suffer, the many deaths due to poor work safety – but recently conditions seem to have been improving.

So three Nepali artists set out to research the situation themselves, being invited to Doha for a period of two weeks. Sheelasha Rajbhandari, Hitmaan Gurung, and Mekh Limbu got to meet many workers, were invited to the many many Nepali organisations, and interacted in art projects with the workers. At the same time three artists from Doha were invited to Kathmandu to deal with the Triennale’s main topic: my city/my studio, namely Abdulla Al-Kuwari , Carolina Aranibar-Fernandez, and Emelina Soares.

Curator Dina Bangdel gives background information on the exciting “Built/Unbuilt: Home/City” exhibition

 

Dina, how did this project come about in the first place?

My longstanding interest in the built heritage and the dynamics of the urban landscape and the agency of the community have been central to my research, and has in this project combined both the curatorial intent within a strong research-based intervention. Notion that the city can be seen as an instigator and catalyst for creative narratives is at the core of this interdisciplinary focus. The experience is mediated through the voices/lenses of the diaspora Nepalis living in Doha to explore these spaces of liminality within the city. How do these communities express narratives of home, belonging, and self within the city? How do artistic expression/entanglements serve to ‘create communities’ within the urban fabric? Artists will then create a body of work that will respond to these transcultural intersections, the lived histories and memories, and narratives of Doha’s past histories.

 

Why these six artists?

The practices of the six artists that I have selected for this collaborative project complement the exploration of two cities: Doha and Kathmandu, with the notion of city serving as the catalyst for dialogue. The city of Doha has historically been a rich palimpsest of cultures—particularly those of South Asia—and the focus of this research-¬‐based curatorial project is on the ways in which artists experiences and identities will touch upon multivalent narratives, storytelling, and orality.
Qatar/Doha plays a critical part in this narrative of nation-¬‐building for both Qatar and Nepal. Qatar has the highest number of Nepali migrant workers, approximately 500,000 who have made Doha their ‘home’. This project therefore seeks to find the narratives of belonging, memory and self within a palimpsest of narratives—centered around the city and its unbuilt or rebuilt spaces. By bringing together Nepali artists and Doha-¬‐based artists in dialogue with the local communities with the city as catalyst, the aims are to examine the layers of narratives that emerge within the lived space.

And the very interesting works showed just that. In a series of photographic works Hitmaan Gurung and Sheelasha Rajbandhari played with the issue of identity when donning the work uniforms of Nepali migrant workers whilst standing next to them, dressed up in their personal clothes.

They also conducted workshops with the workers having them draw their families, getting in touch with the loss and missing of their loved ones (the workers can go home on a visit only every three years and often completely miss the growing up of their children):

Qatari artist Emelina Soarez presented a fascinating work of a “Persian carpet” made in the way of a sand mandala with earths from Qatar, Nepal, and India. She created a beautifully impermanent work of art an invited the guests to walk all over her “carpet”, making the different earths mingle beautifully:

The exhibit also featured video installations by Mekh Limbu (whose own father has been working in Qatar for more than 20 years and whom he got to see again after a period of two years during this project) and Doha-based Bolivian Carolina Aranibar Fernandez, as well as two works by Abdulla al Kuwari – one a rather sharp image of a Kathmandu scenery and the other a total blur, referring to the dust and chaos he experienced during his time in the city.

After the artists talked briefly about their works in the lovely upstairs showroom of Tangalwood, the guests took back to the garden to witness a performance by Nepali artist Sunil Sigdel who proceeded to draw blood from his fingertips, dabbing it up with cotton balls and then offering to the public “his last drops of blood” on a shovel and clad as a desert labourer.

 

The evening proceeded with a fascinating symposium session with both groups of artists, dealing with identity and migration and how they are personally affected, moderated by Dina Bangel and Christine Brosius of Heidelberg University (for the Nepali group) and Veeranganakumari Solanki Jamwal from India (for the Doha-based group).

Pan-South Asian exhibit with Nepali artists in Kolkata

Pan-South Asian exhibit with Nepali artists in Kolkata

“Things Lost/Remembering the Future” is a pan-South Asian exhibition at GANGES ART gallery in Kolkata that explores the ideas of loss, being and regeneration through the lens of personal and public memory. The exhibition is the first of a series that hopes to open up new channels of communication, and understanding, of the region’s unique political/historical reality and its cultural sub-texts. The opening will take place Saturday 25th March at 6pm.

Co-Curated by Kurchi Dasgupta

Curated by artists Kurchi Dasgupta and Amritah Sen, Things Lost/Remembering the Future focuses essentially on the small, the forgotten, the mis-represented as opposed to the official and the monumental. It looks upon the present from both the past and the future and investigates the processes through which historical narratives habitually emerge. We hope it will allow an alternative perception of history to spill through, one that links the South Asian experience to the larger, Global South.

One platform for 14 artists from 8 countries

This is possibly the first exhibition in Kolkata that brings together 14 artists from 8 South Asian countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka) on one platform. The works were selected with an eye on the unexpected in terms of media and content.

Some of the artists are globally established names, some are comparatively new, and a few are fresh graduates. The one aim was to magnify those rare, incisive voices that are consciously commenting on, critiquing and resisting the xenophobic and gender-biased, mainstream idea of the region’s history. The other was to give space to the forgotten and the personal, hoping this would evolve into an inclusive identity map that differs from the currently available version.

A specific, long term aim is to present rigorously curated shows on the theme in each of the involved countries, facilitating a dedicated exchange between cities and cultures, artists and institutions, ideas and viewers, the loaded present and an anthropocenic future. Bhutan will be taking part in the next edition.

Artists:
  • David Alesworth (Pakistan) (alesworth@gmail.com)
  • Kurchi Dasgupta (India) (+ 91 9654871180, kurchi.dasgupta@gmail.com)
  • Tayeba Begum Lipi (Bangladesh) (tayeba.lipi@gmail.com)
  • Huma Mulji (Pakistan) (hmulji@yahoo.com)
  • Aye Ko (Myanmar) (ayekoart@gmail.com)
  • Rahraw Omarzad (Afghanistan) (r.omarzad@gmail.com)
  • Pala Pothupitiye (Sri Lanka) (Pala72@gmail.com)
  • Ashmina Ranjit (Nepal) (ashmina@gmail.com)
  • Amritah Sen (India) (amritahs@gmail.com, +91 9830112217))
  • Sunil Sigdel (Nepal) (sunsee1979@gmail.com)
  • Thisath Thoradeniya (Sri Lanka)(thisath77@gmail.com)
  • Thyitar (Myanmar) (thyitarart@gmail.com)
  • Mustafa Zaman (Bangladesh) (mustafa.zaman21@gmail.com)
  • Maimoona Hussain (Maldives) (maena1982@gmail.com)

 

About Ganges Art Gallery

Since opening in September 2007, Ganges Art Gallery has organized and curated shows and retrospectives for an array of modern and contemporary artists from India and elsewhere in the subcontinent. These exhibitions have showcased the works of not just established but also upcoming artists working in painting, sculpture, video, photography and new media and whose practices are significant within cotemporary art and culture. One of our aims is to expose emerging talent through exhibitions at the gallery and participation in select international art fairs.

Located in a large, refurbished colonial structure in what is fast becoming Kolkata’s gallery hub, Ganges Art Gallery and its shows have received favourable reviews in newspapers and periodicals. We are looking to expand our presence overseas by engaging in strategic partnerships with museums and galleries of note in Asia, Europe and the United States.

Owned and managed by Smita Bajoria, Ganges is, in the future, looking to go beyond the boundaries of a traditional art gallery by hosting talks, art appreciation courses, film screenings and book readings. Our endeavour is to be a centre of creative and artistic excellence in a city synonymous with cultural activity.

33A, Jatin Das Road, Kolkata 700029, India | Tel: + 91 33 2465 3212 | gangesart@bajoria.in | Timings: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Sunday closed) | 2013 © Ganges Art Gallery.

See more from/about Kurchi Dasgupta here>

 

LaLit Interview with Philippe Van Cauteren on KT2017

LaLit Interview with Philippe Van Cauteren on KT2017

Repost of a very fine interview published today, March 20th 2017, in literary magazine LaLit. Learn much about the planning and total process of creating KATHMANDU TRIENNALE 2017 in this highly intelligent conversation with Belgian curator Philippe Van Cauteren.

Taking care of art:
Philippe Van Cauteren and the Kathmandu Triennale

Image: Philippe Van Cauteren, photo by Dirk Pauwels

 

Philippe Van Cauteren is the curator for the upcoming Kathmandu Triennale, which focuses on the theme of the city. He is the Artistic Director of Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst (S.M.A.K.) in Ghent, Belgium. Cauteren has also worked as a freelance curator and publicist in Germany, Mexico, Chile and Brazil, and has been represented twice at the Venice Biennale. In 2015, he was appointed by the RUYA Foundation to curate the Iraqi Pavilion.

… I have this belief – it might be a romantic one – that art is as valid for society as is a butcher, supermarket, religion and law. Art is a means for healing. Through an intangible and nonfunctional way, art can have a therapeutic effect on society.

 

What does curation mean to you as a creative process?

The words “curation” and “curating” come to me with a certain ambivalence. It is only with the professionalisation of the art world that this word appears and has, at times, taken on a bigger importance than even the word “artist”. Recently, the famous curator Hans Ulrich Obrist was wondering if it was not time to find another word for “curator”. This, to me, indicates a problem with the word. If you look at the origin of the word from the latin word “curare”, it means to take care of and cherish. This would be the ideal perspective to look at curating – taking care of the artist by having a solid and substantial exchange to provoke or inspire the right process or intervention.

At the level of an exhibition like the Kathmandu Triennale, which is like a festival, curating is also about trying to understand the place where one works. As best as possible, you have to try to understand the cultural and social surrounding in which you are active. This is a complex element wherever you are active – whether Belgium, France, Iraq or Nepal – you are always an intruder, a guest. But it is about developing empathy for our surroundings and its contexts to identify good and meaningful interventions or additions.

 

In your curatorial statement you state, “An exhibition is namely a tool (for transformation) and an instrument, which generates meaning, and that which serves, in its spatial articulation, to make the predefined artwork to become ‘elastic.’” Can you go into this idea of elasticity as it seems pertinent to your curatorial understanding?

Yes, with the elasticity, I think and hope that we hold the notion that an art work is not a unidimensional thing – it is not something that can be read or understood in one way. It is not to be taken like a scientific model or mathematical proof. How an art work interacts with its surroundings and spectators means that it has a very flexible existence, it always interacts with a plurality of people. What an art work means for you does not necessarily mean the same for me, in this sense, it has an elastic way of existence. In relation to the Triennale in post-earthquake Kathmandu where many things are still fragile and in some cases uncertain and not evident, the artists and the art works need this elastic capacity to answer to the place in which he or she is coming into.

 

So in terms of curating this exhibition, is it more about taking what the artists are doing in terms of that elasticity within their art or are you trying to create a space where those conversations could open up? How do you approach this part of the curation, is it spatial or art based?

Everything starts with the place of course, but you have to feel the necessity. If there is no necessity to do an exhibition then it is better not to do an exhibition. When I came to Nepal in November 2015 to teach a 10-day workshop, I had a fantastic exchange of dialogue with the people whom I was teaching. I fell in love with the city and this idea of doing the Triennale came around from there.

Given how busy I already am, I would not have accepted the proposal to do the Triennale if I did not sense a necessity. For me, necessity should be at the core of every activity. Of course what is necessary for me is not necessary for another person. And in terms of art and culture, there can be a lot of disagreements about necessity. Most politicians, in any country in the world, will not see art and culture as a necessary tool in society. But I have this belief – it might be a romantic one – that art is as valid for society as is a butcher, supermarket, religion and law.

… because an artist thinks, proceeds with and processes images and things as a means to connect the past, present and future. Almost no one else does this.

Art is a means for healing. Through an intangible and nonfunctional way, art can have a therapeutic effect on society. Of course this is not measurable, like how a certain medical treatment can lead to a decline in mortality. On the contrary, art is neither quantifiable nor does it have a direct function. Art holds up an extreme mirror to society. It is the best way to get a critical view of ourselves, our society and the world we live in and there is no better person to do this than an artist – not a journalist or scientist – because an artist thinks, proceeds with and processes images and things as a means to connect the past, present and future. Almost no one else does this.

 

Going back to the idea of curation and this idea of the artist, the Triennale isn’t just happening in one location, it is happening in multiple locations around the city – Patan Museum, Nepal Art Council, Siddhartha Art Gallery, Taragaon Museum – how do you approach the curatorial work itself?

Keep in mind that this is one exhibition happening in four different locations. The Kathmandu Triennale is one exhibition that is interconnected across these spaces. Each of the locations represent four different typologies of spaces. For instance, the Nepali Art Council has long been used for art practices, the Patan Museum reflects a certain part and layer of Nepali history and society, the Taragaon Museum was built to be a hotel by an Austrian architect and is a Western space, while the Siddhartha Art Gallery is a logical place for art.

Each of our locations is being used in a different way and the artists in them are being presented in a different way. In the Art Council, the artworks will interact with each other whereas in the Taragaon Museum you will have separate exhibitions in the individual units you find there. The kind of artist we present in the different places is determined by its architectural gifts. The four locations are of the same importance, but we try to answer to the space with respect to the context and the origin of the place.

The title of the exhibition, as you know, is “The City, My Studio / The City, My Life”. This reflects the notion of the city as a kind of primordial place where life takes place, a source of inspiration, a working ground and context for the art itself. The Triennale is also not just the presentation of the art works but also the conversations, meetings and the sharing of ideas. The art work is just the first step to build collaborations and partnerships.

The Triennale is like a pumping system to show the potential of the arts in other industries in the city. This is why we have invested a lot into our outreach to work with schools and children to give the exhibition as many anchors as possible. We want to show that there is a necessity to continue this and that there should be a second one in 2020. This exhibition is a part of Kathmandu. I am not a person who is here to do my thing and then leave, I bring my experience of close to 20 years in different places and locations but it is the city that is doing the exhibition.

 

What do you think makes the Kathmandu Triennale necessary at this point of time?

I met many Nepali artists – I think around 60 to 70 – from different generations. I have tremendous respect for the engagement with which they work. There were a number of artists who responded to the earthquake by taking art along with basic necessities. These artists took a stance. They said that they too could contribute and address the tragedy by helping people and softening the trauma people went through. You may believe in it or not, but it is a very courageous position for artists to take. The generosity of the artists in Nepal is in taking on cultural responsibility. They go beyond their own need to create their art works and take a position in society.

… the generosity of the artists in Nepal is in taking on cultural responsibility. They go beyond their own need to create their art works and take a position in society.

Another remarkable thing in Nepal is this remarkable continuum of the traditional arts. The tradition is very present while at the other end of the spectrum are contemporary artists and artists who think they are contemporary but are maybe more traditional than traditional artists. It’s fantastic to see so many art practices existing at the same time. However, I see there is a lack of a person – going back to the idea of a curator – who mediates between the artist and their art work. Someone to make their work more precise and help the artist formulate his or her work more precisely and accurately while thinking better about the form and content of the art work. If it is not in the sense of taking care, I have a very ambivalent relationship with the notion of a curator. I hope that the Triennale will show what the role of the curator can be and how meaningful it can be.

 

In terms of the artist taking a stance in society, would you be able to curate an exhibition with artists whose ethical stance or ethos you do not agree with?

I wouldn’t be able to, of course not, but I can understand that the artist is the only person in society who is able to deal with ethical questions in a different way. The rest of us have to work within the parameters of social compromise, whereas the artist is the only one who can stand outside this logic and take on another ethical position: but he or she also has to bear the consequences of it. But I would never collaborate or deal with an artist whose ethical position I would not be able to embrace.

Let me be clear about this – this does not mean I will not engage with artists with whom I disagree, there are after all plenty of positions. Even in this exhibition, there are artists with whom I do not agree 100%, but I still respect them. You do need something in common, even if it is a broad cultural sense and belief in the validation of art for society. In contrast, I would never deal with an artist who promotes ideas of racism, inequality and discrimination or takes a position against humanity.

 

Sticking with the politics that is associated with the arts, and the “city” that is central to the Triennale’s theme. Cities are places of both diversity and inequality: how do you balance the engagement with the city and make it accessible?

All spaces are spaces of inequality, not only the city, like the school system, the medical system. Unfortunately, inequality is one of the most difficult things to get rid of in the world. In Nepal, the caste system is not officially validated, but you will still see it play out for many generations. In my country, as well, various forms of inequality are present. I believe we have to try to have people participate in the Triennale to multiply the moments of contact between artists and viewers. This is why we emphasise our outreach to

… I believe we have to try to have people participate in the Triennale to multiply the moments of contact between artists and viewers.

schools, kids and young people. Most international artists are coming here to have an exchange with Nepali artists. We will be doing workshops, masterclasses, portfolio reviews – I want the artists to come to Nepal not just to enjoy themselves but to work, work, work and share their knowledge and point of views. I should also emphasise that the exhibition is a tool for information and communication. The Triennale is a catalyst. I hope it can add to fighting indifference, inspiring youth and encouraging the next generation to contribute to the future of this country.

 

How do you curate the outreach? Do you design the exhibition and then build the outreach or is outreach part of the exhibition design itself?

At the core of everything is the artist and the art, always. That is the starting point. But, of course, you do not think linearly. You don’t think, first comes the artist and then comes the second thing and then the third thing. You take it all together. So, from the beginning, we said our outreach is important. In each of the four locations, we will have outreach units. Also, the whole process of reaching out to schools and young people has already started and has been happening for months already. You cannot separate it, you have to think of it as a whole. But, we must acknowledge that we can do these things thanks to the artists and the art works.

… the Triennale is a catalyst. I hope it can add to fighting indifference, inspiring youth and encouraging the next generation to contribute to the future of this country.

What happens after the exhibition? Will there be any publications?

The exhibition only lasts two weeks. During this time, the focus is very strongly on things happening in Kathmandu and Nepal even though there will be plenty of guests visiting. We will be making a catalogue for the Triennale by the end of this year to give us time to prepare it well. We will include shots of all the exhibits and will include some critical texts on the exhibition. This catalogue will be the only thing left over from the exhibition, the only tangible thing that will remain. Most art works are temporary and this will be the only record of everything. For me, this catalogue will be a very important tool and will be a means to provide knowledge and information about the exhibition worldwide. We will also use it to prepare for the next Triennale in 2020.

The Kathmandu Triennale will be held in various locations around Kathmandu from March 24, 2016 to April 9, 2017. For further information, please visit: www.kt.artmandu.org.  

Source: LaLIt Magazine

 

 

KATHMANDU TRIENNALE 2017: introducing Ashmina Ranjit

KATHMANDU TRIENNALE 2017: introducing Ashmina Ranjit

Please enjoy the KT 2017*** video presenting one of the participating artists, Ashmina Ranjit, and her work:

 

Artist Statement

My art is rooted in my need to revisit Asian Traditional Culture from a woman’s perspective. Community, its essence and its power are the force that drives me to create. For me, love, social justice, equality freedom and our rights as human beings, living in our societies, our countries, and the world at large are the most important aspect of life. I create paintings, drawings, videos, sound pieces, installations and performances about the socio-political issues with a strong focus on female identity. My work questions female cultural role, social gendering, and physical experiences and sexuality while reclaiming women’s experiences and giving voice to their political concerns and their most intimate expressions of desire, joy and fulfillment. I work on both individual projects and in collaboration with other artists. I also invite the general audience to participate. Social injustice, human violation, and the on going violence in my country Nepal and around the world are critical in my work. In my performances and installation works, participants are invited to express themselves, raise issues of mutual concern and increase awareness of the topic that are addressed.”

 

Biography

Ashmina Ranjit is an interdisciplinary “artivist” who works internationally on themes related to cultural roles, social gendering, sexuality, human rights and other ever-pressing socio-political issues. She has performed and executed various projects in USA, Europe, Australia and Asia.

 

Association

Lasanaa is an artivist organization that begun in 2007. Their main agenda is social reform through art. They seek to have the Nepali art community be more involved with social issues. They believe in bringing people together to allow learning through exchange, social reforms through art and artivisim.

More: http://kt.artmandu.org/curator/ashmina-ranjit/

 

***

Kathmandu Triennale 2017 – The City

Kathmandu Triennale is Nepal’s premier platform for global contemporary arts. It is the latest iteration of the pioneering Kathmandu International Art Festival (KIAF 2009, 2012). Like the precursory Festivals, the Triennale thematically engages particular social issues while advancing a nuanced approach to promote the pedagogical potential of the arts. Through the Triennale, organizer Siddhartha Arts Foundation (SAF) presents multiple perspectives on edition themes – to educate audiences and engage society in critical dialogue. Kathmandu Triennale’s inaugural edition (KT 2017) will be dedicated to the theme of The City and is curated by Philippe Van Cauteren, Belgium while associated museum S.M.A.K an organizing partner of the event. KT 2017 opens on 24 March, 2017.

Official website: http://kt.artmandu.org/

KTM TRIENNALE 2017: introducing Sujan Chitrakar

KTM TRIENNALE 2017: introducing Sujan Chitrakar

Please enjoy the KT 2017*** video presenting one of the participating artists, Sujan Chritrakar, and his work:

Biography

Sujan Chitrakar (b. 1974) is a Kathmandu based visual artist. He is an assistant professor and the Head of Center for Art and Design at Kathmandu University. He is also a recipient of the Fulbright Senior Scholar award 2013-14 for an artistic research project at the mural arts program of Philadelphia. He facilitated the Kathmandu International Art Festival – Earth | Body | Mind in 2012 as a creative and logistic consultant and also co-curated its first edition – Separating myths from the reality in 2009. He has several participations in international group exhibitions that include his representation for Nepal at Fukuoka Triennale 2005 and Colombo Art Biennale 2011. His solos include Utopian introspection! -random expressions within defined periphery, 2004, Masticated faces, 2004 and Let’s talk about art, baby!, 2010-11. He is one of the founding members of Sutra Nepal, an artist-led group pro-active during 2003-08.

 

More: http://kt.artmandu.org/artist/sujan-chitrakar/

***

Kathmandu Triennale 2017 – The City

Kathmandu Triennale is Nepal’s premier platform for global contemporary arts. It is the latest iteration of the pioneering Kathmandu International Art Festival (KIAF 2009, 2012). Like the precursory Festivals, the Triennale thematically engages particular social issues while advancing a nuanced approach to promote the pedagogical potential of the arts. Through the Triennale, organizer Siddhartha Arts Foundation (SAF) presents multiple perspectives on edition themes – to educate audiences and engage society in critical dialogue. Kathmandu Triennale’s inaugural edition (KT 2017) will be dedicated to the theme of The City and is curated by Philippe Van Cauteren, Belgium while associated museum S.M.A.K an organizing partner of the event. KT 2017 opens on 24 March, 2017.

See the official website: http://kt.artmandu.org/

KTM TRIENNALE 2017: presenting Jupiter Pradhan

KTM TRIENNALE 2017: presenting Jupiter Pradhan

Please enjoy the KT 2017*** video presenting one of the participating artists, Jupiter Pradhan, and his work:

Artist’s Statement

“Art has a great amount of gravity, which is constantly satisfying. Art and its utility is slowly growing into an absolute understanding of reality. And when this absolute understanding is attained, perhaps that attainment is what is known as enlightenment. In search of satisfaction, art has taken me closer to the elements of society. This is how I can touch, play & speak with society, delve deep inside it. This is how I relate myself to my surroundings. Streams of experiences and expressions begin to flow from within me. This is when art becomes a medium to me.”

Biography

Jupiter Pradhan, holds a BFA in painting from the Tribhuvan University (2005) and an MFA in painting from the University of Development Alternative, Dhaka, Bangladesh (2009). Pradhan is a multi-media artist whose artistic expression includes performance, video, painting and craft. He has had solo exhibitions in Kathmandu and the Fukuoka Asian Art Museum, Japan. Pradhan’s works have also been included in several group exhibitions in Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Japan. Art residencies have taken him to Japan, South Korea and Indonesia. Pradhan, who is an active curator and art event organizer, was also an exhibiting artist in the 2nd Kathmandu International Art Festival 2012.

 

More: http://kt.artmandu.org/artist/jupiter-pradhan/

***

Kathmandu Triennale 2017 – The City

Kathmandu Triennale is Nepal’s premier platform for global contemporary arts. It is the latest iteration of the pioneering Kathmandu International Art Festival (KIAF 2009, 2012). Like the precursory Festivals, the Triennale thematically engages particular social issues while advancing a nuanced approach to promote the pedagogical potential of the arts. Through the Triennale, organizer Siddhartha Arts Foundation (SAF) presents multiple perspectives on edition themes – to educate audiences and engage society in critical dialogue. Kathmandu Triennale’s inaugural edition (KT 2017) will be dedicated to the theme of The City and is curated by Philippe Van Cauteren, Belgium while associated museum S.M.A.K an organizing partner of the event. KT 2017 opens on 24 March, 2017.

See the official website: http://kt.artmandu.org/